This Monday 12/6/17 we'll be closed for the long weekend

Glow Worm Bicycles | Bicycle Servicing and Repairs Sydney

Glow Worm Bicycles has a fully equipped mechanical workshop and carries out quality servicing and repairs on a wide range of bikes, electric and otherwise. You're very welcome to visit with any type of bike for a quote on repairs. We love bicycles but we are not snobs and although we can't fix every type of bike out there, you'll be treated warmly and respectfully regardless of what type or condition of bike you bring in! Our workshop is focused on repairing bikes and won't try to push you into purchasing a new bicycle.

Generally there is no need to book in a repair, it is okay to just show up with the bike. You'll be able to talk to one of our mechanics about what you'd like done on your bicycle and will receive an obligation-free quote for the job and an estimate of how long it will take. We'll phone again when the bike is done. The turnaround time is generally 1-3 days and it will help us greatly if bikes are picked up promptly.

Below is a list of prices for common repair and service jobs. Scroll further down the page for tips on basic bicycle care you can do at home.

Quick Tune-up   $69 

Sometimes you want your bike to be brought up to optimal order before it really needs a thorough service. The tune-up is appropriate for bikes that are generally in good condition but have some small issues to sort out. Perhaps it hasn't been ridden in a while but has been stored indoors and you just want it cleaned up and checked over to be sure that it's safe and functioning well when you get back on the roads. As a guide, if your bike needs new parts then it needs more than a tune-up. The Tune-up includes:

- brake service

- gear service

- minor wheel true (wheels stay on bike while being trued)

- lube chain

- safety check

- pump tyres to correct pressure

General Service   $119  

The General Service is recommended about 2-3 months after purchasing a new bike, and 1-3 times a year after that depending how you're using your bike. It will have the bike running safely and smoothly, with the brakes and gears working at their best as well as increasing the longevity of the bike and wheels.

The General Service includes the following:

- Safety check

- Straighten derailleur hanger and tune gears

- Adjust/tighten brakes

 - lubricate brake and gear cables

- True wheels on truing stand

- Wipe down and Lubricate chain

- Check tightness of all bolts and screws

- Wipe down bike

- Pump tyres to correct pressure

- That little something that you can't get at home

The service price does not include the cost of any parts needed, or the labour for installing them. For example if a bicycle needs a new gear cable, the price will be $89 + the price of the cable ($8) = $97. If however a whole gear shifter needs replacing the price will be $89 + the price of the gear shifter (let's say $25) + labour for installing the gear shifter ($10) = $124. A bike that has not been serviced for a long time and requires replacement parts is a candidate for the Full Service (see below), which includes the labour cost of installation of parts and is more appropriate for a bike in rougher condition.

Complete Overhaul: $269

Every year or two, a quality bicycle should be completely overhauled. It will extend the life of the bike, and save you money in the long run. The Complete Overhaul includes:

  • Remove seatpost, stem, wheels, chain, derailleurs, cranks, bottom bracket and forks from frame
  • Clean frame
  • Disassemble, clean and regrease front and rear wheel hubs, replacing bearings and cones if necessary
  • Clean braking surfaces of rims/rotors
  • True wheels in truing stand
  • Disassemble, clean and regrease bottom bracket (incl. chasing threads)
  • Remove headset bearings, clean and regrease
  • Degrease and lube drivetrain components
  • Replace and lube brake and gear housing and cables
  • Straighten derailleur hanger and adjust gears
  • Clean/face brake pads
  • Adjust brakes
  • Tighten bolts of racks, mudguards etc.
  • Inflate tyres to correct pressure
   

Specific repairs

Puncture repair including tube   $20 (extra $10 for harder to remove wheels)
True and dish wheel      $25
Replace spoke(s) and true wheel          $35 (+ $1.50 per spoke)
Gear service                   $30
Brake service                  $30
Bleed hydraulic brakes $25 each
Repack/grease headset   $20
Repack/grease bottom bracket or wheel axle  $30
Bottom bracket replacement $20 (more if old bottom bracket is stuck in bike)
Wheel axle adjust  $15
Wheel axle replace   $30
Pack bike in freight box  $45 (we can also quote to send the bike anywhere in Australia for you)
Wheel build labour               $75
Tyre fitting, wheel replacement   $10 each
Fit pannier rack/front basket    $15
Fit baby seat    $25
Fit mudguards    $25
Assemble and service bicycle from box (eg bought online or from Kmart)    $100 (Kids' bike $50)    

Approximate Prices of common parts

Rim Brake pads  $12/pair
Disc brake pads $20-40/pair
Brake/gear cable or housing $8
Innertube  $8
Rim tape   $5 each
Stainless steel spoke  $1.50
Chain:  Single speed $13 6-7-8spd $30 9spd $39 10spd $75  

Poor quality bicycles

We don't enjoy telling people that their bicycle is not worth servicing, but we also don't enjoy servicing very poor quality bikes. They take much longer to service, with unsatisfactory results. This puts both us and the customer in a bad situation where the bike hasn't improved enough to justify the repair bill but we've still worked on it for an amount of time that requires payment. Unfortunately we have to have a policy on bikes below a certain quality level to keep everyone happy. Quality is of course subjective but generally bicycles bought from supermarkets or new bikes bought for a steal online fall into our category of "poor quality bicycles". Please do not be offended by our policy, we understand that people often buy these bikes with the best intentions but that doesn't change the reality of working on the bike. You can read more about substandard bicycles and how to avoid them on our post about buying used bicycles. Our policy for these bikes is that we only carry out the following services and repairs: - We can build the bicycle from the box (it won't be perfect!) - Replace innertubes, tyres and wheels - Replace chain - Tighten headset - Install basic parts and accessories such as racks, baskets, grips, pedals  

Basic bicycle care

Here is a list of bicycle care procedures anyone can do at home, designed to be as simple and straight to the point as possible. These procedures are in addition to periodical servicing by a bicycle mechanic. 


1) Keep tyres at correct pressure. Do this weekly, or if you're fanatical and have high pressure tyres, daily

- A floor pump with a pressure gauge is much easier for this than a handpump. (Hand-held pumps are better suited to carrying with you when cycling for emergencies or long rides.) Make sure your pump can be used with the type of valve you have on your tube. Most new pumps can be used on both of the main types: the Schrader (also called the American valve, used also on car tyres) and the Presta (Also called French valve, high-pressure valve or skinny valve). We sell presta-schrader adaptors for $3 to let you pump your tyres up with conventional or even service station pumps, but it's not an ideal strategy - a good bicycle pump is the best way to go.
- Remove the plastic valve cap. The Presta valve needs to have the metal tip unscrewed to pump. Keep the flap on the pump head down and push head down over the valve, then lift flap to lock the head onto the valve. Then pump away. For a Presta valve, screw the tip back in all the way after pumping.
- Your tyres will typically have a minimum and maximum recommended pressure written on the sidewall. Generally pump toward the higher end of this range.

* Benefits of keeping tyres pumped * 
- A much faster ride. Every bit of pressure reduces rolling resistance
- Helps to avoid flat tyres

- Reduces wear and damage to rim, tube and tyre


2) Keep chain lubricated. Do this at least 1-2 times monthly, or more often if you have been riding on wet days or using a light lubricant.

- Do not use WD40 as a lubricant. a degreaser can be used to clean the chain when it is filthy, but a lubricant should still be used afterward.

- The easiest thing to do is get an all-rounder lube from a bicycle store. Apply lube to the chain while rotating the pedals backwards with one hand until the entire chain has been lubed. Try to get every link, but don't overdo it. Run the bike through all the gears, front and back. Wait 5 minutes then hold a rag around the chain with one hand applying light pressure, and rotate the pedals with the other hand. This is to wipe away excess oil which will only attract dust and dirt. 

Benefits of keeping chain lubricated
- Drastically reduces wear on chain, sprockets and derailleur
- Makes for a smoother, faster, quieter ride

3) Tighten brakes

- Most braking systems come with 'barrel adjusters' located where the cable enters the brake lever. These are designed for quick and easy adjustment of the brakes as cables stretch and brake pads wear down. If your brakes feel a little loose, you can unscrew the barrel adjuster by turning it anti-clockwise with your fingers. Unscrewing it too much will result in the brake pads rubbing against your wheel, and also be careful not to unscrew the adjuster all the way out. Secure the position of the adjuster by screwing in the locking nut clockwise all the way. If the adjusters have reached their limit and the brakes are still not tight, it's time for a brake service at your local bike shop.

4) Storage and inspection

- Check out this link, some wise words about what has been covered here, as well as some pointers on storage and inspection of bikes.